« Bike Beats Chelsea TractorH2's Gas Mileage »

12 comments

Comment from: Janis Martin [Visitor]  

We are Canadians whose daughter is a student at the University of Jyvaskyla in Saumi, so we were not suprised to hear that someone was singing Elvis Presley’s songs in the hotel, but had no idea that the Saumis ever sing in Latin. Mind you, we don’t know if our daughter could distinguish the language from Finnish, which seems to be quite complex! We also hear that the Finns are wild about latin dances, especially the tango, so perhaps if it had not been off season, couples would have been dancing the tango to the Elvis impersonator’s renditions.

Kiitos, kiitos very much for the information. We aren’t doing too well trying to learn Finnish, so maybe we had better try Latin prior to the next visit.

03/12/07 @ 01:21
Comment from: theboy [Member]  

Thanks for the note. I, too, find Finnish baffling. Musical it is not.

After we had exhausted every other topic of conversation on a long car trip, a friend once tried to convince me that Finnish, combined the best features of German and Latin. This meant, according to him, that Finnish was destined to be the language of the future.

We still laugh about his repeated conclusion - “It’s the next Esperanto!”
I can’t say he wasn’t right.

03/12/07 @ 06:34
Comment from: Avalon [Visitor]  

The correct Finnish spelling for Finland is Suomi.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Suomi is a Finnish word that most commonly refers to either:

Finland, a northern European country (written with capital initial letter: Suomi); or The Finnish language itself (written with lower-case initial letter in Finnish: suomi or suomen kieli)

03/12/07 @ 08:09
Comment from: theboy [Member]  

Does that mean that struggling to learn Finnish could be referred to as “suomi wrestling"?

03/12/07 @ 08:29
Comment from: Michelle [Visitor]  

I spent three months in Finland working as an au pair with the SWAP program about 16 years ago. I managed to learn about 100 words during that time, but there was no way I could string them together into sentences. I’ve heard the Finnish language described as similar to Mandarin Chinese, in the sense that it relies so heavily on intonation, but it always sounded to me slightly Japanese or Hawaiian…

03/13/07 @ 16:32
Comment from: Flo Speakman [Visitor]  

Learning finnish is entirely up to the people who surround you when you live there. I had some very dynamic friends in the 11 months I was an exchange student. After about 3 months, they essentially stopped speaking English to me and I was able to hobble through the language.

The syntax is very similar to Japanese in some ways. But once you learn it, you are able to understand the culture so much better!

03/16/07 @ 12:56
Comment from: myhha [Visitor]  

Very interesting article, thanks

08/26/09 @ 08:58
Comment from: mhenriday [Visitor]  

Readers may find it interesting to learn that whatever the provenance of the Latin Grammar shown in the illustration above, the language in which the book was written was not Finnish (suomi), but Swedish (svenska). As to Finnish syntax, while being a highly inflected language which allows for great freedom of word order, the usual order is SVO, rather than SOV as in the much less inflected Japanese. Moreover, Finnish verbs are conjugated according to person and number, whereas Japanese verbs are not. All in all, modern speakers would find it difficult to discover many points of similarity between these two languages….

Henri

11/21/09 @ 18:03
Comment from: chris [Visitor]  

After we had exhausted every other topic of conversation on a long car trip, a friend once tried to convince me that Finnish, combined the best features of German and Latin. This meant, according to him ( http://www.rapidsloth.com ), that Finnish was destined to be the language of the future.

03/09/10 @ 23:23
Comment from: chris [Visitor]  

After we had exhausted every other topic of conversation on a long car trip, a friend once tried to convince me that Finnish, combined the best features of German and Latin. This meant, according to him ( http://www.rapidsloth.com ), that Finnish was destined to be the language of the future.

03/09/10 @ 23:26
Comment from: imarion [Visitor]  

dvlce et decorvm est pro nokia labore. finnibvs non problemas cogitens, itaqve divertens inventen.

07/19/11 @ 10:24
Comment from: Alexes Lin [Visitor]  

combined the best features of German and Latin. This meant, according to him , that Finnish was destined to be the language of the future. that is really sad:(

08/14/11 @ 01:46